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Philly Joe Jones Solo Book: A Treasure Trove of Jazz Drumming Transcriptions

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Philly Joe Jones Solo Book: A Treasure Trove of Jazz Drumming Transcriptions


Philly Joe Jones Solo Book: A Treasure Trove of Jazz Drumming Transcriptions

If you are a fan of jazz drumming, you probably know the name Philly Joe Jones. He was one of the most influential and innovative drummers of the hard bop era, playing with legends like Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, and many more. He had a distinctive style that combined swing, groove, creativity, and technical mastery.

But how can you learn from his drumming? One way is to listen to his recordings and try to imitate his solos and breaks. Another way is to get a copy of the Philly Joe Jones Solo Book, a remarkable collection of over 380 pages of transcribed drum solos by Joerg Eckel, a student of John Riley.

The Philly Joe Jones Solo Book is not just a book of notes. It is a book of history, culture, and inspiration. It contains solos from various albums and sessions that Philly Joe Jones participated in, spanning from 1953 to 1985. Each solo includes stickings and references to the original recordings. You can see how Philly Joe Jones evolved as a drummer over time, how he adapted to different musical contexts, and how he expressed his personality through his drumming.

The Philly Joe Jones Solo Book is also a book of education, challenge, and fun. You can use it to improve your jazz vocabulary, your technique, your timing, your dynamics, and your musicality. You can study the solos by ear or by reading the transcriptions. You can play along with the recordings or practice them on your own. You can analyze the solos or just enjoy them.

The Philly Joe Jones Solo Book is a book that every jazz drummer should have in their library. It is a book that honors the legacy of one of the greatest masters of the art form. It is a book that will enrich your drumming and your appreciation of jazz music.

You can get a copy of the Philly Joe Jones Solo Book at Memphis Drum Shop, Columbus Percussion, or Reverb.[^1^] [^2^] [^3^] The book costs around $50 – $60 and it is well worth it. As Adam Nussbaum said, “This is an incredible work to study. A document of devotion, dedicated to one of the greatest masters of the art form.”

But who was Philly Joe Jones? How did he become such a master of jazz drumming? To answer these questions, we need to look at his biography and his musical influences.

Philly Joe Jones was born Joseph Rudolph Jones in Philadelphia on July 15, 1923. His mother was a piano teacher who taught him the basics of music. He also learned tap dancing as a child and appeared on a local radio show. He was influenced by the swing drummers of the 1930s, such as Chick Webb, Jo Jones, and Sid Catlett. He also admired the bebop pioneers of the 1940s, such as Kenny Clarke, Max Roach, and Art Blakey. [^4^]

He served in the US Army during World War II and then moved to New York in 1947. He became the house drummer at Café Society, where he played with many bebop stars, such as Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, and Fats Navarro. He also toured with Lionel Hampton and Joe Morris. He developed a reputation as a versatile and creative drummer who could play in any style and situation. [^4^]

He joined Tadd Dameron’s band in 1953 and stayed with him until 1954. He then became a sought-after freelance drummer, working with Sonny Rollins, Thelonious Monk, Bud Powell, and many others. He also recorded as a leader for Riverside and Atlantic. His most famous association was with Miles Davis Quintet from 1955 to 1958, along with John Coltrane, Red Garland, and Paul Chambers. This group is considered one of the finest jazz ensembles of all time, and Jones was an integral part of its sound and success. He played with a combination of power, precision, swing, and sensitivity that complemented Davis’s lyrical trumpet and Coltrane’s adventurous saxophone. He also contributed original compositions to the group’s repertoire, such as “Blues by Five” and “Two Bass Hit”. [^4^]

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